Architectural Photography – Curt Weinhold http://curtweinhold.com/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 10:51:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://curtweinhold.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Architectural Photography – Curt Weinhold http://curtweinhold.com/ 32 32 Obituary: Juris K. Ubans – Portland Press Herald https://curtweinhold.com/2022/01/09/obituary-juris-k-ubans-portland-press-herald/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 06:01:01 +0000 https://curtweinhold.com/2022/01/09/obituary-juris-k-ubans-portland-press-herald/ Juris K. Ubans PORTLAND – Juris K. Ubans passed away on December 30, 2021 at the Gosnell Memorial Hospice House. He was born in Riga, Latvia, the third son of Konrads Ubans, a prominent painter, and Elina Gailitis Ubans. He spent his early childhood in a time of terror, when the Soviet Union brutally occupied […]]]>

Juris K. Ubans

PORTLAND – Juris K. Ubans passed away on December 30, 2021 at the Gosnell Memorial Hospice House. He was born in Riga, Latvia, the third son of Konrads Ubans, a prominent painter, and Elina Gailitis Ubans. He spent his early childhood in a time of terror, when the Soviet Union brutally occupied Latvia, then the Nazi regime, followed by the return of the Soviets. At this point the family was separated and his mother and three children fled to the West. After a very difficult year as refugees, they were housed in a camp run by the International Refugee Organization in Germany. In 1950 they were able to emigrate to the USA and settled in Syracuse, NY, and became designers for architectural offices. On his return to New York, he graduated from Syracuse University with a BFA. In 1966 he moved to Penn State with his wife Mara, where he received his MFA degree in 1968.

Juris began teaching in the Art Department of Gorham State Teachers College, which later became USM, and taught there until his retirement in 2009.

He taught painting and film and was instrumental in developing the curriculum for the needs of the new and developing institution. At the same time he was director of the Art Gallery until 1995. He developed it from a company on a $ 50 budget in the first year to an influential and respected university gallery with a sizable collection of original works, particularly photographs. He contributed a lot to the culture committee, initiated film series and brought renowned artists to the campus. He was a popular and influential teacher. Several of his former students became lifelong friends and his greatest support during his illness.

In the 1970s, he and like-minded friends founded the Film Study Center, which brought foreign art films to Portland for the first time. He soon expanded his efforts nationwide and served on the Maine Commission on the Art and Humanities for five years. He organized nationwide touring film series, which were supplemented by community discussions led by humanities scholars. He has served on a committee or on the board of trustees of numerous museums and galleries in Maine. A commitment at the national level followed when he became Commissioner of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design. He toured the country and accredited schools and arts departments. In 1992 he was appointed to the American Folk Life Center of the Library of Congress by Senator George Mitchell and served as Chairman of the Board of Trustees of that organization from 1994-96. He really enjoyed the Washington DC experience

When Latvia was finally able to free itself from submission to the Soviet Union in 1991, he immediately made connections with the Latvian National Museum and the Latvian Academy of Art. After visiting Latvia in 1973 to meet with his father, he saw the backwardness and limitations artists and scholars had to live under and eagerly joined international efforts to bring academic standards up to European and American standards Bring level. He became a member of the examination board of the art academy, advised its curriculum, taught there for two semesters as a senior Fulbright scholar and was appointed honorary professor of the academy. On returning to USM, he established an exchange program between the Academy and USM, which gave a number of students the opportunity to experience a different culture and a different approach to art.

Although art was the focus of his life, he was a versatile person. He was a highly rated chess player. Once he even beat Bengt Larsen, the Danish grandmaster, during a simultaneous exhibition in Santa Monica. He was a good tennis player who rose to the national senior games as a member of a doubles team. He practiced Tai Chi in Portland for many years. He was an avid art collector of all genres and has donated generously to numerous museums from his collection, including the Portland Museum of Art and Farnsworth.

His two brothers died before him. He leaves behind his 56-year-old wife, Mara.

Arrangements are under the direction of the Conroy-Tully Walker Funeral Home, 172 State St., Portland. To view the Juris memorial page or to offer condolences online, please visit http://www.ConroyTullyWalker.com

Instead of flowers, a donation can be made to the USM Foundation to complement the Juris Ubans grant for painting, printmaking, and photography.

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“Power of the Dog” focuses on psychological terror, tension https://curtweinhold.com/2022/01/05/power-of-the-dog-focuses-on-psychological-terror-tension/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 15:15:02 +0000 https://curtweinhold.com/2022/01/05/power-of-the-dog-focuses-on-psychological-terror-tension/ Despite its recognizable mix of cowboys, cattle and the open border, “The Power of the Dog” by director Jane Campion was never conceived as a true western. From Campion’s point of view, the story is far too specific for that. Based on the 1967 novel by Thomas Savage and set on a Montana ranch in […]]]>

Despite its recognizable mix of cowboys, cattle and the open border, “The Power of the Dog” by director Jane Campion was never conceived as a true western. From Campion’s point of view, the story is far too specific for that. Based on the 1967 novel by Thomas Savage and set on a Montana ranch in the 1920s, the Netflix film is less of a blanket hymn of praise to the Old West than a tight and terrifying psychological meditation on mystery, oppression, and misguided anger .

The American setting may be a first, but for Campion this is familiar territory. Since her explosive 1989 debut “Sweetie” she has been more interested in the unconscious and the local horrors that profoundly change and infect family relationships. A gorgeously rendered character study in a remote landscape is not a new concept even for the acclaimed director of “The Piano” and “Top of the Lake”.

“I tend to agree with Jane,” says her cameraman Ari Wegner, who shot the film in breathtaking locations in Campion’s native New Zealand to replace rural Montana. “When we were shooting, I never thought of it as a western, even though it has all the classic, western elements. Everything, that is, except weapons. “

It’s a telling omission following the accidental death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins on the set of Rust, a western born from a more traditional template. But Wegner says guns are irrelevant given the kind of psychological violence she, Campion, and the A-list cast wanted to explore on screen. “What we’re really interested in is this really delicate, really tiny energy and tension between people,” she says. “For us the danger was already in the house. It is not necessary to draw a weapon to scare someone and keep them mentally immobile. “

How she and Campion told the story of two very different brothers and the new family turning their fragile peace on its head began with a year of preparation together in New Zealand exploring places, exploring looks, and thinking about camera style and tone . They spent many months just on the color palette. “There were really so many directions that we could take,” says Wegner. “We talked a long time about black and white and then some kind of hand-toned technicolor style.” They went for a muted, dusty look, with a little more color than sepia, ranging from brown to silver and gold that go with the grass and fit the mountains that anchored many of the recordings.

With strong, contrapuntal performances by Benedict Cumberbatch, Kirsten Dunst, Kodi Smit-McPhee and Jesse Plemons and a haunting score by Jonny Greenwood from Radiohead, Campion and Wegner made sure not to visually overload any scene. “You can’t have everything at the same time in a film,” says Wegner. “It feels like too much sugar or unnecessary jewelry or something. A great performance with a great score and great photographs is not what we were trying to do. “

Campion preferred an equally no-frills style of shooting that even extended to overhead shots captured by drones that were never too conspicuous. “It was very clear to Jane that she never wanted the camera to move in a way that manipulates itself emotionally,” says Wegner. “So we would try not to push an important moment forward. The camera should only move when an actor is moving instead of moving on its own to get a point. ”

What Campion pushed or nudged gently were the actors and filmmakers. “The amazing thing about Jane is that she really manages to make you comfortable, to feel uncomfortable,” says Wegner, just as her films often do for audiences. “I still can’t say how she does it. Being outside of your comfort zone feels strange, but once you are there it feels great because you have a new comfort zone. “

Cinematographer Ari Wegner and director, writer and producer Jane Campion on the set of “Power of the Dog”.

(Kirsty Griffin / Netflix)

Wegner says she aimed her camera “to keep an unbiased look at what we were seeing, knowing that the feeling for the audience should end up being quite complex, not one particular emotion but several, in fact conflicting emotions. ” It is summarized by the note on one of your shot folders. “I had written ‘highly retrospective experience’. We wanted to create a feel for an audience that would stay with you for a while, an experience that would make you think about it and try to tease it out long after it ended. “

Kirsten Dunst in "Power of the dog."

Kirsten Dunst in “The Power of the Dog”.

(Courtesy Netflix / Courtesy Netflix)

Shot in large format with the Arri Alexa Mini LF camera in 4K, which Netflix requires, Wegner opted for long Panavision Ultra Panatar lenses, which are best for capturing landscapes and delivering a classic widescreen look. Intense, detailed storyboarding led them there. “We drew pretty much every frame of every shot, and at some point our rectangles got longer and longer,” she says. “Jane had a couple of them printed and kept tearing off the edges. The mountain range, the cattle drive, the large table in the main room, even Phil’s braided rope: so many shots became long, thin and wide. That’s when we noticed that this film was widescreen. ”

Inside the family home, “an architectural masterpiece” built on a sound stage by Oscar-winning production designer Grant Major, Wegner played subtle lighting and rich, historical details. Rose’s room has such an abundance of rose-patterned wallpaper and shades of red and pink that the filmmakers saw “green” when they walked off the set after a long scene. Large photographs of the outdoor scenes on billboards behind the set’s open windows were especially helpful, she says, as they gave the actors and filmmakers a more complete staging than any blue screen could provide.

Wegner says she admires Campion’s fearless intuition for improvisation most of all. “She’s great at facing her fears and starting with the toughest and most challenging things,” says Wegner. “It took us a year to plan, but everything was always ‘subject to change’. She knows herself well enough to understand that if she is too tied to something, she is not doing her best job. Even if we have invested a lot of time, money or thought in the setup, she is incredible at following her gut feeling. “


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Small-town togetherness is reflected in the new school – School News Network https://curtweinhold.com/2022/01/03/small-town-togetherness-is-reflected-in-the-new-school-school-news-network/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 15:38:35 +0000 https://curtweinhold.com/2022/01/03/small-town-togetherness-is-reflected-in-the-new-school-school-news-network/ Sparta – English teacher Alec Dood, whose class recently shared the literary experience of “Glow Games” with Jenna Conlin’s class, said “Every student was engaged” in the ultimate blackout neon experience at Sparta Middle School. While the students switched stations that included challenges such as cuppong, water bottle butting, soccer throwing, and bowling, they worked […]]]>

Sparta – English teacher Alec Dood, whose class recently shared the literary experience of “Glow Games” with Jenna Conlin’s class, said “Every student was engaged” in the ultimate blackout neon experience at Sparta Middle School.

While the students switched stations that included challenges such as cuppong, water bottle butting, soccer throwing, and bowling, they worked to identify literary terms.

The implementation of unique lesson times such as the glow games has been reinforced by the design of the new building. The middle school and the architecture and engineering office GMB, based in Holland, were honored by “Learning by design a magazine highlighting unique K-12 and college building designs that best promote learning.

“It’s one thing to build a building, but it’s quite another to build one that not only works well but also reflects the values ​​of the children and the people who live in it,” said Brad Wood, director of Sparta Middle School.

“This is a small town with an enormous sense of togetherness that has been integrated into the design of this building.”

Space to study

Each classroom hallway has project rooms with easily sliding walls and furniture so teachers can expand their classrooms as needed.

“We can go to 10,000 square feet in minutes,” said Wood. “The room is designed to be flexible, and the type of teaching that can be carried out in this building is also flexible.”

An art student is working on capturing light

A recent business showcase presented by Conlin’s ELA students in collaboration with the West Michigan Business Association was an example of how the new spaces can be customized.

“Students had the opportunity to interview business leaders, examine the company’s goals and missions, and find out what makes West Michigan a great location for their business,” said Dood.

Staff and students attending the event had the opportunity to learn about local businesses, vote for the most effective presentations, and see sixth and seventh graders showcasing authentic work created in a project-based tutorial.

“It’s one thing to build a building, but quite another thing to build one that not only works well, but also reflects the values ​​of the children and the people who live in it.”

– Brad Wood principal of Sparta Middle School

The rooms affect how students work, Wood said. “The light, the free spaces and the access to technology enable better learning and have a positive effect on behavior. That gives the curriculum a unique energy. “

Art and photography teacher Julie Aitken said the design of the space allowed her to “give lessons that encourage students to think outside the box”.

Tables on wheels and adjustable lighting were suitable for a “light painting” project, for example, in which the students used a slower shutter speed on the camera to capture light trails and create a 3D sphere effect.

A source of optimism

The new middle school was part of a $ 58.6 million bond that was passed in 2016. It opened in the fall of 2020, at a time when the districts weren’t even sure if students would enter the building. While it seemed disappointing at the time not to have an open house for the community and taxpayers who voted for funding, the extra space was welcomed and made for easier social distancing rules during school hours.

But as difficult as the first year was, the specially designed study room seemed and remains a ray of hope in the district, said Wood.

“It served as a source of optimism when people needed something,” he said. “The whole district is proud and grateful for this place.”

Discover more unique video stories about student learning, engaging school programs, and educators working to make all children succeed.


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Real Estate Newsletter: Wild Plan to Save LA’s Largest Mansion https://curtweinhold.com/2022/01/01/real-estate-newsletter-wild-plan-to-save-las-largest-mansion/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 15:00:59 +0000 https://curtweinhold.com/2022/01/01/real-estate-newsletter-wild-plan-to-save-las-largest-mansion/ Welcome back to the real estate newsletter and a happy new year! I’m honored to jump into your inbox every Saturday and I look forward to continuing my weekly appearances in 2022. As the real estate market generally slows to a lull around the holidays, two extremely ambitious, highly controversial developers kept the news cycle […]]]>

Welcome back to the real estate newsletter and a happy new year! I’m honored to jump into your inbox every Saturday and I look forward to continuing my weekly appearances in 2022.

As the real estate market generally slows to a lull around the holidays, two extremely ambitious, highly controversial developers kept the news cycle going.

The first was Nile Niami, the beanie and sunglasses wearer developer who built the largest modern house in the United States called “The One.” He’s worked on the 105,000-square-foot mega-mansion for the past decade, but he’s about to lose it to a foreclosure sale after running $ 180 million in debt on the property.

He called the Times from a moped spinning through a jungle in Thailand and outlined his latest plan to keep the extravagant house in his own hands – and it involves cryptocurrency and a desperate plea to Elon Musk (or any other billionaire ).

The second was Mohamed Hadid, the reality TV star, who tried to cram a 30,000-square-foot mansion into 1.22 acres in Bel-Air. The neighbors didn’t have it, and a Los Angeles court ordered the mansion to be demolished. This infamous home auctioned off for $ 5 million and the demolition is about to begin for the stain that Bel-Air residents do not affectionately refer to as “the Starship Enterprise.”

Over in the small town of Bradbury, In-N-Out’s owner and heiress Lynsi Snyder sold her 19,000-square-foot mansion for $ 16.25 million. The palatial property was bought with burger money from a former Dodgers star and includes a two-hole golf course with a sand trap.

Downtown LA’s Arts District got good news when Spotify unveiled Pod City: a campus with 18 podcast studios, a theater, an indoor stage, and places for musicians to tinker with vintage instruments. The hub will allow the streaming service to attract new talent and produce more original shows.

We also have a new edition of Gimme Shelter, Liam Dillon and Manuela Tobías’ outstanding podcast on the housing crisis. This week they spoke to a first-time millennial buyer about how to buy a home.

While you catch up on the latest, visit and like our Facebook pagewhere you can find property stories and updates all week.

One final plan to save “The One”

A look at a 4,000 square meter bedroom with private pool in the mega villa “The One” in Bel-Air.

(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

Nile Niami needs someone to take him into the stratosphere.

This is the developer’s latest plea in a video released on Monday Night while trying to stop the looming auction of “The One,” the 105,000 square foot mega-villa he created over the past decade.

On December 16, Niami’s development company Crestlloyd filed an agreement in the US bankruptcy court to auction the extravagant property to the highest bidder to multiple lenders over the years. The auction would run from February 7th to February 10th.

It is the latest chapter in an increasingly dramatic feud for the largest modern home in the United States that Niami is making wild plans to prevent its lenders from selling the home to offset their losses.

Hadid’s doomed mega-mansion goes up for auction

An unfinished mansion stands on a slope.

The unfinished mansion at Strada Vecchia Road 901 in Bel-Air will be shown in May 2017.

(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

After half a decade of criminal charges and legal battles, developer Mohamed Hadid’s half-finished mega-villa was auctioned for $ 5 million. Next, it will be destroyed.

Hadid, a reality TV regular and father of models Bella and Gigi, bought the property in 2011 and quickly set out to cram a 30,000-square-foot home onto the 1.22-acre lot that was both larger and larger was higher than city regulations allowed. Back then he said the house would last forever.

Bel-Air neighbors feared the code-breaking property would slide down the hill and crush the houses below and took him to court, where an LA County judge declared the bulky building a “public hazard.” and ordered the demolition.

After a failed attempt to stop the destruction caused by bankruptcy, the Hadid-affiliated company eventually had to launch it for $ 8.5 million. With no takers, the price was eventually lowered to $ 5.5 million before being auctioned off by Premiere Estates Auction Co for $ 5 million.

Burger heiress makes a small fortune

Lynsi Snyder's 4 acre estate.

Lynsi Snyder’s 4 hectare estate includes a palatial mansion, guest house, swimming pool, tennis court, basketball court and two-hole golf course.

(IM Real Estate Photography / David Guettler Photography)

The town of Bradbury saw its most expensive sale in years when Lynsi Snyder, owner and heir to burger chain In-N-Out, sold her Mediterranean mansion for $ 16.25 million.

It’s a loss to Snyder, who bought the nearly 19,000-square-foot home from former Dodgers star Adrián Beltré in 2012 for $ 17.21 million. She first launched it for $ 19.8 million in 2017 before dropping the price to $ 16.8 million this year, records show.

The lavish estate extends over 4 acres in Bradbury Estates, a gated community just a few miles from Baldwin Park, where Snyder’s grandparents started the first In-N-Out in 1948.

Spotify Brings Hub to Downtown LA

A conference table equipped with microphones is located in a library-like room.

The main studio on Spotify’s new campus.

(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

By the time Executive Courtney Holt joined Spotify four years ago, the music streaming giant had outgrown its Sunset Boulevard office and teams were scattered across the Los Angeles borough, writes Wendy Lee.

The workforce continued to expand as the Swedish company expanded into the podcasting business and acquired LA production companies, Ringer and Parcast. The need to create a central space where everyone can work together became even more important.

Step into Pod City, the centerpiece of Spotify’s sprawling new campus in the Arts District of downtown Los Angeles.

The campus – which can accommodate up to 600 employees – includes 18 podcast studios, a theater, an indoor stage and places where musicians can tinker with vintage instruments, including a piano that was once made by singer-songwriter Norah Jones was used.

Podcast delves into millennial home purchases

Single family homes in the Historic Oak Park neighborhood.

Single family homes on 3rd Avenue on 42nd Street in the Historic Oak Park neighborhood in January.

(Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

Few places in the country are more expensive to buy than California, but even here, recent increases in home values ​​have been astounding, writes Liam Dillon.

The median sales price for a single family home in the state rose 12% over the past year to $ 798,440, according to the California Assn. from brokers. Home buyers, especially first time buyers, are increasingly having to shell out more of their incomes and savings to get into the market.

In the latest episode of “Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Podcast”Dillon, a Los Angeles Times reporter, and Manuela Tobias of CalMatters talk to a millennial first home buyer about how to buy a home.

That guest is Matt Levin, former Gimme Shelter co-host who is now a reporter for the public broadcaster Marketplace. Levin bought his home in Sacramento in early 2021, and the podcast explores how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed home buyers’ expectations.

What we read

Jeff Bezos is the second richest person in the world, so his real estate portfolio is of course one of the best. Architectural Digest made a list of homes he has bought over the years, including a Seattle estate that he bought in 1998 and a Hawaiian estate that he acquired for $ 78 million in 2021.

New year, same trends. US house prices rose 18.4% in October, with all 20 cities on the dataset seeing double-digit year-over-year gains. AP has the details.


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UNStudio’s Shanghai Jiuguang Center is inaugurated https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/30/unstudios-shanghai-jiuguang-center-is-inaugurated/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 07:30:54 +0000 https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/30/unstudios-shanghai-jiuguang-center-is-inaugurated/ the Shanghai Jiuguang Center, the largest shopping complex in northern Shanghai, designed by UNStudio Architectural firm in collaboration with Nihon Sekkei, was recently completed and inaugurated. The two companies worked together to create a structure that could also serve a social role and become a point of reference not only for customer-consumers but also for […]]]>

the Shanghai Jiuguang Center, the largest shopping complex in northern Shanghai, designed by UNStudio Architectural firm in collaboration with Nihon Sekkei, was recently completed and inaugurated. The two companies worked together to create a structure that could also serve a social role and become a point of reference not only for customer-consumers but also for the community. architect Ben van Berkel from UNStudio, at the presentation of the project for the Shanghai Jiuguang Center, emphasized the social role of this type of building in China. Not just a complex of retail stores, but public spaces serving the city, where culture and trade come together and where architecture fulfills a broader function.
the Shanghai Jiuguang Center was built in a busy part of Shanghai with an architecture office Nihon Sekkei Design of the outer shell and UNStudio Design of all interiors of the mall, including the central courtyard and its facades as well as the public roof terrace.
The user experience, understood both as a shopping experience and as an interaction with the different rooms, was the main idea behind the development of the project. The outer layer of the complex looks like a protective shell that opens inward to reveal a flowing and luminous experience. Paths and emotions converge in the central core, a floor-to-ceiling courtyard designed as an inner landscape. The great central void thus appears like a pearl of light, an effect that is reinforced by the ceramic tile cladding of the courtyard facade, which assumes dynamic mother-of-pearl reflections when exposed to sunlight. The floor-to-ceiling void allows cross-sectional views and visually connects all levels of the complex, which are connected by flowing escalators and a scenic staircase that traverses the central cavity.
Equipped with green areas and seating integrated into the structure, the inner courtyard is a pleasant meeting point and resting place that users can enjoy at any time of the day and at the same time accommodate shopping center or community-relevant events. Distributed around the courtyard and connected to it by protruding balconies and ribbon windows, there are three internal cavities. The materials and finishes chosen for each cavity define three different identities, corresponding to three different shopping themes that run vertically through the complex: the “urban playground“in which lights and colors evoke the dynamism of the metropolis,”the urban oasis“in which warm colors are inspired by nature and finally”urban catwalk“in which dark, shiny materials recreate the city’s nocturnal atmosphere. The ceiling contains an element that allows users to navigate easily and indicates service areas and vertical connections (elevators and escalators) next to the cavities.

(Agnese Bifulco)

Images courtesy of UNStudio, Photos by © Aaron & Rex

Project name: Shanghai Jiuguang Center
Client: Lifestyle China Group Limited
Location: Jing’An, Shanghai, China
Date: 2014-2021

Building surface:
Shopping center GFA: around 120,000 m²
Retail design area: 50,000 m2
Office design area: Approx.18,290m2
Program: courtyard facade, shop fittings, office furnishings, courtyard landscape
Status: completed

Credits
Architect: UNStudio,
UNStudio team:
Ben van Berkel, Astrid Piber, Hannes Pfau with Ger Gijzen, Marc Salemink, Sontaya Bluangtook and Daniele de Benedictis, Dongbo Han, Enrique Lopez, Lars van Hoften, Tiia Vahula, Martin Zangerl, Mo Lai, Ningzhu Wang, Shuang Zhang, Marta Piaseczynska , Chao Liu, Cristina Bolis, Tom Wong, Yang Li

advisor
Local architect: TJAD
Facade consultant: Schmidlin
Light design: Bartenbach

Photography: © Aaron & Rex


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10 underrecognized artists who made their money in 2021 – ARTnews.com https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/28/10-underrecognized-artists-who-made-their-money-in-2021-artnews-com/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/28/10-underrecognized-artists-who-made-their-money-in-2021-artnews-com/ After June 2020, almost every institution issued a statement that it will make changes to become more inclusive. Their promises asked an interesting question: what would happen if museums primarily showed works by more colored artists and addressed the gaps in art history? In other words, what would it be like for museums to do […]]]>

After June 2020, almost every institution issued a statement that it will make changes to become more inclusive. Their promises asked an interesting question: what would happen if museums primarily showed works by more colored artists and addressed the gaps in art history? In other words, what would it be like for museums to do what they should be doing all the time?

The good news is that art history is changing. The bad news is that it is slowly changing. In 2021, for every poll devoted to a buried giant of the last century, it seemed to hand in another, even bigger poll to one of the most revered white male artists in art history. Such is the case this winter, for example, at the Guggenheim Museum in New York, where an Etel Adnan exhibit is clumsily made to share the space with a Wassily-Kandinsky poll. Since 2010 alone, the Guggenheim has held seven Kandinsky exhibitions in its various museums. Until 2021, Adnan, who died that year, had never had a New York museum exhibition.

Still, there were overlooked personalities who finally got their rights in 2021 when museums began to change their behavior. With each of these showcases, whether as outstanding presentations in group exhibitions or as long overdue retrospectives, these artists shone anew and earned their place in the annals of art history.

Below is a look at 10 artists who have emerged from the shadow of art history thanks to major presentations this year.


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In-Town Gallery starts the new year with the exhibition “New Beginnings” https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/27/in-town-gallery-starts-the-new-year-with-the-exhibition-new-beginnings/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 16:18:30 +0000 https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/27/in-town-gallery-starts-the-new-year-with-the-exhibition-new-beginnings/ In 2021, In-Town Gallery welcomed six new talented artists to the cooperative. Each of these artists brings a new dimension to the visual art collection shown in the gallery. All of these artists will be featured in January and on the first Friday of the gallery’s open door on January 7th. Renel Plouffe, is a […]]]>

In 2021, In-Town Gallery welcomed six new talented artists to the cooperative. Each of these artists brings a new dimension to the visual art collection shown in the gallery. All of these artists will be featured in January and on the first Friday of the gallery’s open door on January 7th.

Renel Plouffe, is a French-Canadian painter who now lives in Ooltewah. She paints with acrylic, oil, pastel, spray paint and charcoal and creates abstract expressionism pictures built up in layers. Renel’s paintings show an interesting balance between beauty and chaos. She earned a BSA in graphic design and completed a specialization diploma in 2D / 3D animation. Renel is a magician with color, an artist who can paint somber and creepy motifs in exquisite pastel tones, beautiful neon and candy colors.

Luck followed Sean Price when he traveled to Maui at the age of 20 to visit his sister who worked in a glass gallery and studio. Enchanted by what glass can make, he took the opportunity to become an apprentice, lived in Hawaii, and learned and honed his talent in an ocean-view studio. Thirty years later, Sean creates sculptures from flamed glass and continues to be enchanted by the processes and possibilities of color and the various elements that can be applied to his creations.

Although he has lived in Chattanooga for a long time, Lora Miller developed her inspiration for the art when she traveled with her military family as a child and now continues the beauty she feels in nature and her travels to local small towns in the south. Lora’s experience and talent have resulted in works that are exuberant with color and playful simplicity in design. For most of her career, she has focused on watercolors, which she describes as impressionism that can turn into the abstract. During the pandemic she did a lot of acrylic painting and developed many of her watercolors on large canvas works with acrylic paints.

Brent Weston has a very unusual and interesting story. His artistic background was inspired by trips to Europe, where he spent many years on adventure trips through the Alps and small towns in Italy. Brent was an architecture student at Georgia Tech in the late 1980s, and many of his paintings reflect memories not only of his travels, but of his love for structure as well. Brent graduated from the Atlanta College of Art and the UTC painting and drawing program. In 2016, Brent tragically lost about 100 of his paintings in a warehouse fire. But now he’s really looking forward to exhibiting his new works at In-Town.

photographer Sybil Topelwho has a master’s degree in fine arts, moved to Chattanooga in 2014. Although many of her photographs reflect the natural beauty of the river and mountains, her particular love is scenes with details that tell the story of a city, of both its renewed and abandoned or neglected architectural structures. Sybil’s work is divided into three areas: emotionally charged landscapes, bizarre / humorous juxtapositions and pop culture overlaid with references to art. Her work was selected by the Hunter Museum’s Spectrum Art Committee for its prestigious annual art auction and is also on display at the Edwin Hotel.

Robin Howe was exposed to art through her grandfather, an artist and architect who was a master of lines and details. Art for Robin went in a different direction. Restrictive rules aside, she relies on tools like her fingers, popsicle sticks, and granola packs to give her works a sense of freshness and freedom. Their art provides an opportunity to play, explore, reflect, and hopefully bring joy to others. When inspired, she gets lost in her work and lets the outside world dissolve. Your efforts have resulted in well-deserved recognitions and awards.

At the beginning of the new year, the artists of the In-Town Gallery present a wide range of inexpensive arts and crafts, including paintings in various media, sculptures, ceramics, works made of wood and metal, unique jewelry, fine art photography and hand -painted silk- Wearables.

The In-Town Gallery is located on the north coast of Chattanooga at 26A Frazier Avenue. The opening times are Thursday to Monday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Please visit us during these times or visit us on January 7th for our First Friday reception from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. You can also see the creations of our artists and shop at www.intowngallery.com.


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