Landscape Photography – Curt Weinhold http://curtweinhold.com/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 02:52:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://curtweinhold.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Landscape Photography – Curt Weinhold http://curtweinhold.com/ 32 32 What is the crop factor and why is it important for photographers? https://curtweinhold.com/2022/01/08/what-is-the-crop-factor-and-why-is-it-important-for-photographers/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 16:30:00 +0000 https://curtweinhold.com/2022/01/08/what-is-the-crop-factor-and-why-is-it-important-for-photographers/ Crop factor is a term that is often used when talking about cameras and lenses. So what is it exactly? Here is everything you need to know. The crop factor can be a confusing subject, especially if you’re not shooting with a full frame camera. Here we discuss what crop factor is and why it […]]]>

Crop factor is a term that is often used when talking about cameras and lenses. So what is it exactly? Here is everything you need to know.


Man photographed behind picture frame

The crop factor can be a confusing subject, especially if you’re not shooting with a full frame camera. Here we discuss what crop factor is and why it is important for photographers.

What is the harvest factor?

The crop factor is the formula used to determine the focal length based on the sensor size of the camera. Based on the full-frame 35 mm format (sensor size), a full-frame SLR, DSLR or mirrorless camera system has a crop factor of one. In other words, if you put a 35mm lens on a full frame camera, you have an effective 35mm focal length. 35 mm multiplied by one equals 35.


A Carl Zeiss lens held in hand

The real math comes into play when you are dealing with other popular formats like APS-C camera systems. Most of these cameras have a crop factor of 1.5 (Sony, Nikon) or 1.6 (Canon). A 35 mm lens on a Sony APS-C camera would have an equivalent focal length of 52.5 mm, roughly that of a 50 mm lens on a full-frame camera. 35 mm multiplied by 1.5 equals 52.5.

There are many other camera systems that have different crop factors. Micro four thirds cameras have a crop factor of two, while smartphone cameras have different and different crop factors.

Refer to the instruction manual or search online to find the crop factor for your camera.

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What this means for your choice of lenses


Vintage lenses on a table

Depending on the type of photography you’re interested in, the crop factor can make choosing lenses difficult when you need a specific focal length. For example, if you take a lot of landscape shots and need a long focal length like 24mm, it is good to know that full frame cameras give you that focal length for almost any 24mm lens that you use with it.

However, if you own an APS-C camera, for example, then you should look for a 16mm lens for most brands of cameras (1.5 crop factor) or a 15mm lens if you have a Canon APS C (1,6-Crop) own factor). In these cases, you’ll need to divide the crop factors to get the equivalent 35mm focal lengths.

You may also want to learn the differences between prime and zoom lenses before buying a new camera lens.

A deeper insight into the harvest factor

The following video goes in depth and helps visualize the crop factor and its application to photography.

Not to be confused with the crop factor, cropping in photo editing is also helpful if you want to achieve other focal lengths.

Harvest factor is important

From getting the right focal length to choosing the right lens for the job, knowing your camera’s crop factor is important. It will support your photography immensely by allowing you to capture your subjects with the correct focal length.


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Candid shots in street photography can produce stunning results, but it’s not always the best route. Let’s discuss the pros and cons.

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Painting takes me to another dimension https://curtweinhold.com/2022/01/07/painting-takes-me-to-another-dimension/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 07:35:00 +0000 https://curtweinhold.com/2022/01/07/painting-takes-me-to-another-dimension/ The Prince of Wales has described how he finds painting so relaxing that it “takes me to another dimension” as the largest exhibition of his works of art is being staged. Seventy-nine of Charles’ watercolors – the first full exhibition of his work in this medium – are on display at the Garrison Chapel in […]]]>

The Prince of Wales has described how he finds painting so relaxing that it “takes me to another dimension” as the largest exhibition of his works of art is being staged.

Seventy-nine of Charles’ watercolors – the first full exhibition of his work in this medium – are on display at the Garrison Chapel in Chelsea, London.

The atmospheric paintings show Scottish landscapes such as the Huna Mill in John O’Groats and Glen Callater near Balmoral, as well as exterior scenes from Provence in southern France and Tanzania in East Africa – one of the prince’s favorite places to paint.

Huna Mill from the Prince of Wales (Richard Ivey / Prince’s Foundation / PA)

In a display, Charles reveals how the hobby “refreshes parts of the soul that other activities cannot” and how he started painting after he had found little joy in photography.

He writes about the therapeutic benefits: “You become more and more aware of things that you may not have considered before – things like the quality of light and shadow, of tone and texture and the shape of buildings in relation to the landscape.

“All of this requires maximum concentration and is therefore one of the most relaxing and therapeutic exercises that I know.

“In fact, I find it in my case that it transports me into another dimension that literally refreshes parts of the soul that other activities cannot reach.”

But he admits that he is “horrified” by the quality of his early sketches.

“I only started painting because I found photography less than satisfying,” he writes.

Prince’s Foundation exhibition of Charles’ watercolors in Garrison Chapel in London (Richard Ivey / Prince’s Foundation / PA)

“Quite simply, I felt an overwhelming urge to express what I was seeing through the medium of watercolor and to convey that almost ‘inner’ sense of texture that is impossible to achieve with photography.

“I realized very quickly how incredibly difficult it is to paint well in such a spontaneous medium, and the feeling of frustration at not being able to get the picture that presented the eye on paper is intense.

“When I look back on my first sketches, I am appalled at how bad they are. The nice thing about painting, however, is that you interpret the chosen point of view individually. “

From the Haughs, Glen Callater, towards Tolmount through the Prince of Wales (Richard Ivey / Prince’s Foundation / PA)

He adds, “I have no illusions that my sketches represent great art or a nascent talent.

“Above all, they represent my special form of ‘photo album’ and as such mean a lot to me.”

The exhibition in the exhibition room of the Prinzenstiftung in the chapel began before Christmas and will reopen on Monday for a longer period until February 14th.

Rosie Alderton, exhibition curator for The Prince’s Foundation, said, “HRH has already said that he likes to sit in the real world and paint en plein air, and that taking photos is not the same thing for him.” Feeling like a painting .

Charles paints in Paro, Bhutan, during a royal visit in 1998 (John Stillwell / PA)

“His passion for creating fine art is strongly conveyed in this exhibition.”

Charles paints whenever his schedule allows, and he usually takes his precious canvas and leather painting bag on royal tours in the hope that he will have time for them.

His interest – encouraged by his art master Robert Waddell at his Gordonstoun school – grew in the 1970s and 1980s when he was able to meet leading artists.

He discussed the watercolor technique with the late Edward Seago and received further instruction from professionals such as Derek Hill, John Ward, and Bryan Organ.

An exhibition at Hampton Court Palace in 1998 to mark the prince’s 50th birthday featured 50 of his watercolors, while the National Gallery of Australia’s exhibition in 2018 marked his 70th birthday and featured 30 works.

Alongside Charles ‘art, Ben Hymers’ woven rendition of the 2003 Prince’s painting Abandoned Cottage on the Isle of Stroma will be featured.

The complex tapestry, which took eight months to make at Dovecot Studios in Edinburgh, was presented to Charles in 2019 and can normally be seen at the Castle of Mey in Caithness.


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Island photographer honored with Canadian Photo of the Year 2021 https://curtweinhold.com/2022/01/05/island-photographer-honored-with-canadian-photo-of-the-year-2021/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://curtweinhold.com/2022/01/05/island-photographer-honored-with-canadian-photo-of-the-year-2021/ Peter Baumgarten during his art exhibition in 2019. File photo MANITOULIN – Renowned Manitoulin Island photographer Peter Baumgarten is one of 13 outstanding photographers who selected one of his works as one of the best images of 2021 and was selected as one of the winners of the Canadian Photos of the Year 2021 competition. […]]]>

Peter Baumgarten during his art exhibition in 2019. File photo

MANITOULIN – Renowned Manitoulin Island photographer Peter Baumgarten is one of 13 outstanding photographers who selected one of his works as one of the best images of 2021 and was selected as one of the winners of the Canadian Photos of the Year 2021 competition.

“One of my pictures was selected as the winner in the Epic Landscapes category of this year’s Canadian Geographic Photos of the Year competition,” Baumgarten told The Expositor last week. “You had over 7,000 entries in the competition, the largest participation in years.”

Mr. Baumgarten won in the Epic Landscapes category for his photo, which is described as: “Strokes of sunlit clouds over Providence Bay on Manitoulin Island, Ontario reflect the island’s layered rock formations.”

Mr. Baumgarten stated, “I took the picture on October 25, 2022 in Providence Bay near the marina. Providence Bay is one of my favorite places to photograph the sunset. It has a beautifully varied coastline, from its lovely sandy beach to the rugged limestones that are typical of the Niagara strata. Usually I am looking for something interesting that I can put in the foreground of my landscape paintings. “

“On this special evening I noticed the thinly layered layers of rock and it seemed to be the perfect point of interest against the similarly striped sun clouds,” continued Mr. Baumgarten. “When the last bit of sunlight peeked through an opening in the clouds, that was the icing on the cake. These types of conditions are rare in landscape photography. I knew I had a good picture when I saw it on the camera’s LCD. ”

Mr. Baumgarten said: “I am particularly proud that a picture of Manitoulin Island was selected. When you think of epic Canadian landscapes, you often think of Banff, Gros Morne, or something similar. Manitoulin has some epic scenes, just on a smaller scale. “


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Jenn’s Favorite Movies in 2021 https://curtweinhold.com/2022/01/01/jenns-favorite-movies-in-2021/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 07:49:00 +0000 https://curtweinhold.com/2022/01/01/jenns-favorite-movies-in-2021/ By my count, I’ve seen 236 releases in 2021 (by far an all-time record for me!) And yet: I’m miserably behind! I was so happy to be able to return to my happy place in the (carefully distant and masked) theater for the second half of this year. But I was also back to work, […]]]>

By my count, I’ve seen 236 releases in 2021 (by far an all-time record for me!) And yet: I’m miserably behind! I was so happy to be able to return to my happy place in the (carefully distant and masked) theater for the second half of this year. But I was also back to work, and the last movie I saw in a movie theater was 4 weeks ago which basically means that Everyone of the major writer and franchise writer and December franchise releases are still out of my reach! There are so many marquee titles I haven’t gotten to yet that I feel like my final top 10 could stand out in the end all films other than those currently occupying the top slots. Of the 38 films named in the top 10 of my 5 SunBreak colleagues, I haven’t seen 17 (and I’m dying for it) – although my list also includes 7 posts that no one has mentioned! The year is over and I can’t drag it out anymore, so my work is in progress here: 10 of my favorite films (that I’ve seen so far) from 2021!

10. dune (Denis Villeneuve)

A bit of a controversial choice, I know. But as a fan of patient, slow science fiction, beautiful landscape photography, and Oscar Isaac, I found this film an absolute feast. I’m sure it made a world of difference that I could see it on an IMAX screen, completely capturing my attention and field of vision. Like many others, I was surprised (and a little disappointed) when, when I switched off the lights, I found that this was only part 1 and therefore did not have a satisfactory result, but still I was completely blown away. Contrary to David Lynch’s much maligned efforts in 1984, I found this film to have a completely understandable story, so I didn’t focus on analyzing the labyrinthine space politics, which I didn’t care, but rather observing the intricacies of character and thinking overarching things Subjects as I lose myself in those gorgeous views and cheekbones.

(Dune is currently for rent on various VOD platforms, but it will be back on HBO MAX in not too long time.)

9. C’mon C’mon (Mike Mills)

For me, Mike Mills never made less than a five-star film. Miranda’s husband July deals a little more loosely with the precious peculiarity factor than she does (without leaving it completely behind) and uses the fertile access point of family histories to take an easier path to understanding human existence. Joaquin Phoenix is ​​a perfect fit as a spiky uncle trying to reintegrate his estranged family into his life, and the black and white photography is beautiful.

(C’mon C’mon is currently playing in theaters and for rent on various VOD platforms.)

8th. Down in the soil (Ben Wheatley)

Ben Wheatley’s latest folk horror entry slipped its insidious little tendrils into me when I saw him on virtual Sundance in January, and he hasn’t let go. The complex layered sound design and the score, which consists of acoustic clips that were actually recorded from recordings of plants, are worth the price of admission. Come to Joel Fry’s kind comic relief, but stay because you are trapped here forever – wait, I mean, stay to find out what this mysterious stuff deep in the forest is!

(The Earth is currently streaming Hulu.)

7th At three (Jerrod Carmichael)

Comedian Jerrod Carmichael’s directorial debut with him and Christopher Abbott agreeing to a suicide pact is gritty, gritty, and heavy, with a solid pinch of laughter and a really nice portrayal of deep male friendship. It’s not a simple or fun watch, but it’s very human and ultimately beautiful.

(On the Count of Three isn’t legally seen anywhere right now, but watch out. It’s worth it.)

6th The beta test (Jim Cummings)

Jim Cummings came along strong. out of the gate Thunder road (my favorite movie of 2018), and it hasn’t stopped swinging since then. This year’s in-depth look at toxic modern manhood comes via the story of a Hollywood talent agent who is on the end of his rope trying to keep all the plates of his life going at the same time. Cummings’ razor-sharp comedic instincts get sharper when they turn to the mockery of an industry he knows himself, and these shots don’t miss them.

(The beta test is currently available for rent on various VOD platforms.)

5. How it ends (Daryl Wein & Zoe Lister-Jones)

I don’t know why this little pandemic film went over so well with me and apparently no other, but for me it really hit a nerve. When Zoe Lister-Jones’ Liza and a metaphysical embodiment of her younger self (Cailee Spaeny) roam Los Angeles to bond open ends on the last day before the end of the world, the film blends whimsy and goofy humor – and some of my favorite comedic ones Scene outcomes of recent memories, thanks to the extremely deep bank of the top-class improvisers in the cast – with the difficulty of finally facing past traumas and regrets and processing them.

(How It Ends is currently available to stream through Epix or can be rented on various VOD platforms.)

Mughal Mowgli: Riz Ahmed raps in front of a crowd, bathed in blue spotlights and wearing a sleeveless white hoodie.

4th Mughal Mowgli (Bassam Tariq)

Riz Ahmed is a musician who derailed his life due to an illness that he initially stubbornly refuses to admit and with which he is slowly coming to terms – and I am not talk about my favorite 2020 movie, Sound of metal. Somehow he and the director Bassam Tariq managed to incorporate autobiographical story points plus Ahmed’s own current rap music as well as fantastic and hyper-real elements to address issues of confusion, longing and alienation from one’s own family and cultural identity as a British member of the South Asian diaspora , and it all comes together in a shape that feels completely fresh and unique.

(Mogul Mowgli is currently rentable on various VOD platforms.)

3. The Green Knight (David Lowery)

This one also shows up on three of my five SunBreak coworkers’ lists, so I know I don’t need to go any further, but David Lowery created a masterpiece here. Visually beautiful and luscious, curvy and surprising in structure and history, even if you know the legend of Sir Gawain (the Arthurian Legend course I took in college finally came in handy; I knew an English language degree would one day pay off !) thanks to an impressive performance by Dev Patel, and two by Alicia Vikander!

(The Green Knight is currently rentable on various VOD platforms.)

2. Strawberry villa (Kentucker Audley & Albert Birney)

By far the most imaginative production design of the year can be found in this hallucinatory, absurd, but strangely emotionally anchored and sweet thought-melter. Highly recommended for fans of Narnia-like fairy tales and trippy altered consciousnesses. I saw this movie and Live Q & As for support, at two different virtual parties in 2021, and I still don’t feel like I’ve had enough of it.

(Strawberry Mansion is currently nowhere legally viewed, but be careful. It’s worth it.)

1. Barb and Star Go to Vista Del Mar (Josh Greenbaum)

By far the silliest, most absurd and downright cheerful comedy that has been on our screens for years: Director Josh Greenbaum and co-writers / stars Kristen Wiig and Annie Mumolo have given us the antidote to the all too serious blues 2021. Who would have thought Jamie Dornan had that comedic pooch-sincere straight man in him ?! Plus the best use of Harry Belafonte since Beetle juice! “Morgan Freemand”! Trisch !! This song!!! And it’s just amazing how well they have managed to create characters who are so exaggeratedly silly, just joyfully ridiculous without being mean, and then somehow managed to put them into a story with real heart and care to pack, not just total nonsense. It’s so much weird AND cuter than I imagined it would be. Seriously an amazing achievement. I challenge you to watch this and not giggle for joy!

(Barb and Star Go to Vista Del Mar is currently streaming on Hulu.)

Honorable mentions and what-if:

As you can imagine, this list has many asterisks and attachments. Lots of commendable mentions first: wish I had more room to spot more of this year’s gems, like Crypto zoo, This city, Wyrm, Blue Bayou, The souvenir part II, country, Belfast, Annette, The hand of God, and No one.

And then, as I mentioned earlier, I have a huge list of films that I expect you to love, but have yet to see. Right at the top of that list is right now Nightmare Alley, titanium, Drive my car, The prodigal daughter, Licorice pizza, Flee, Parallel mothers, Benedetta, The tragedy of Macbeth, pass, About endlessness, Maze of the cinema, Red missile, Days, Petite Maman, Spencer, Werewolves inside, and A hero. (I told you there are many!)


All of Sunbreak’s year-end lists: Josh | Persecution | Chris | Tomorrow | Tony


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Landscape pieces exhibited at SAMA-Bedford | features https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/30/landscape-pieces-exhibited-at-sama-bedford-features/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 20:00:55 +0000 https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/30/landscape-pieces-exhibited-at-sama-bedford-features/ Picturesque landscapes are presented in a regional exhibition. Landscapes from the Permanent Collection is in the Titelman Galleries and the Paula and Dean Lemley Gallery at the Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art, Bedford, Anderson House, 137 E. Pitt St. The exhibition captures the development of the landscapes from the realistic to the painterly-abstract style. It […]]]>

Picturesque landscapes are presented in a regional exhibition.

Landscapes from the Permanent Collection is in the Titelman Galleries and the Paula and Dean Lemley Gallery at the Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art, Bedford, Anderson House, 137 E. Pitt St.

The exhibition captures the development of the landscapes from the realistic to the painterly-abstract style. It shows works by artists of the 19th and 20th centuries such as Thomas Hart Benton, John Sloan, George Hetzel, Frederick Alan Counsel and Ron Donoughe.

“The history of landscapes is very interesting and has been around since ancient times,” said Kris Peterson, SAMA-Bedford Visitor Services representative.

“With landscapes, you can often be taken to places that you may not have seen before and you can get an idea of ​​other people’s views. When you come in as a visitor to look at the landscapes, you see them from different perspectives. “

She said an example of seeing a landscape from a new perspective is “Blue Hills, Pennsylvania” by Counsel.

“The colors are pretty vivid, and if you’ve ever driven past the hills when they aren’t that bright blue, here in Pennsylvania we have a different perspective of these historic mountains,” said Peterson.

“The artist chose to paint them in a kind of illustrated way that you might see in a children’s book, which makes them very appealing. If you’re from Pennsylvania and you’ve seen these mountains, you may have seen them this way, so for some people it brings back memories. “

She said another piece on display, “Black Water” by Donoughe, takes her back to a time when she lived in Alaska.

“When I look at this painting, I miss Alaska a bit, so it brings back a memory and it’s nice to hopefully revisit those happy times in your life,” said Peterson.

The exhibition includes 35 works in media ranging from watercolor to oil and acrylic to pastel colors and ink to photography.

“There really is a lot of variety and that makes it interesting,” said Peterson.

When selecting pieces for the show, Peterson said, staff look for continuity, color, and emotion.

“When we put them together, we pay attention to the style,” she said.

“When choosing the pieces, you look for what could have a certain effect and what touches the people who come in.”

Peterson said the pieces are in the three rooms of the Titelman Galleries.

“The first gallery is filled with very colorful, Impressionist-style spring paintings,” she said.

“In the second gallery it’s more of a mountain landscape, and the colors are more beige and brown and earth tones.

“The last gallery is colorful with beautiful photographs as well as traditional paintings of garden landscapes with fields and meadows.”

In connection with the exhibition, works by the well-known Pennsylvania artist Edward J. Glannon are on view at the Paula and Dean Lemley Gallery.

“In his paintings we have a lot of clouds and valleys first and foremost, and I can imagine that this type of landscape would appear at the beginning of the 20th century.

“He really had that love of nature, and that’s what you get from his pictures. You can really feel what he wanted to show you. “

She hopes the exhibition will arouse the curiosity of viewers to go out and imagine their own landscapes.

“Go to the Blue Hills of Pennsylvania or Colorado and find your own scenery, appreciate the surroundings and the outdoors,” said Peterson.

The opening times of the museum are Tuesday to Saturday from 12 noon to 4.30 p.m.

Admission to the exhibition is free.

For more information call or visit 814-589-3020 www.sama-art.org.

Kelly Urban is a reporter for The Tribune-Democrat. She can be reached at 814-532-5073. Follow her on Twitter @ KellyUrban25.


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Local photographer Nic Stover gives tips on how to get the best shot | Arts and entertainment https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/29/local-photographer-nic-stover-gives-tips-on-how-to-get-the-best-shot-arts-and-entertainment/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 00:05:00 +0000 https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/29/local-photographer-nic-stover-gives-tips-on-how-to-get-the-best-shot-arts-and-entertainment/ Posted on December 28, 2021 | 4:05 pm Nic Stover The Wildling Museum of Art and Nature is hosting a personal workshop with Central Coast photographer Nic Stover on Sunday, January 30th from 2pm to 4.30pm to improve your editorial skills. “In this session, students will see how the most powerful and compelling images are […]]]>

Posted on December 28, 2021
| 4:05 pm

Click to enlarge

Nic Stover

The Wildling Museum of Art and Nature is hosting a personal workshop with Central Coast photographer Nic Stover on Sunday, January 30th from 2pm to 4.30pm to improve your editorial skills.

“In this session, students will see how the most powerful and compelling images are those that strike the right balance between technique, vision, and processing,” said Stover. “All of these skills have to be developed and constantly refined through our own artistic and creative processes.”

The skills covered in the course will help participants learn to evaluate images for creating or building a portfolio, and will also cover simple ways to correct minor distractions in post-production to give participants more confidence to use their creativity in new ways to express.

“We are pleased to offer this course with renowned local photographer Nic Stover,” said Stacey Otte-Demangate, Executive Director of the Wildling Museum. “We hope our Sharing the Light exhibition inspires visitors to immerse themselves in their own photography and Nic can give them great pointers on how to take their work to the next level.”

The “Van Gogh Blue” photo by Nic Stover.
Click to enlarge

The “Van Gogh Blue” photo by Nic Stover. (Nic Stover)

The first half of the course explores some basic concepts of composition and image design, while the second half of the course provides a hands-on review of participants’ images with discussions on ways to change or modify recording or processing techniques.

The course fee is $ 75. Students should plan to bring two or three photos to review (printed or pre-submitted) for the exam portion of the class. To pre-register and learn more, visit www.wildlingmuseum.org/news/2021-nic-stover-photo-workshop.

The class size is limited to 12 participants. Masks are required at the Wildling Museum under the Santa Barbara County Public Health Mandate. E-mail [email protected] or call 805-686-8315 with any questions. The Wildling Museum of Art and Nature is located at 1511-B Mission Drive in Solvang.

Stover grew up in the mountains of western Colorado with a single magazine subscription to National Geographic and five television networks, the only shows his family watched regularly being Nature (PBS) or the Tour de France. Here his love for adventure, nature and travel took shape.

Based in San Luis Obispo, Stover focuses on landscape photography courses and workshops, as well as the sale of custom and limited edition prints. He enjoys showcasing the Central Coast’s unique locations, from sea caves to sand dunes to dramatic coastal landscapes.

His landscape photography has taken him from the Greenland hinterland to the windy mountains of Patagonia and the icy extremes of Alaska. His portfolio includes aerial photography, desert, ocean, night and mountain photography.

For more information, visit www.stoverphoto.com.


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How the founder of Luupe changed the economic landscape for creatives and photographers https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/27/how-the-founder-of-luupe-changed-the-economic-landscape-for-creatives-and-photographers/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 10:45:00 +0000 https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/27/how-the-founder-of-luupe-changed-the-economic-landscape-for-creatives-and-photographers/ Keren Sachs, founder of The Luupe, is changing the landscape of content creation for producers and … [+] Photographers. Erin Patrice O’Brien Since people continue to give up their jobs in the wake of the great resignation, the creative industries are in a constant growth phase. According to the Policy Circle, that Creative industries Industries […]]]>

Since people continue to give up their jobs in the wake of the great resignation, the creative industries are in a constant growth phase. According to the Policy Circle, that Creative industries Industries have annual sales of $ 2.25 trillion and 30 million jobs worldwide. In addition, almost half of these workers are women. But just because more and more people are choosing to do what they always wanted to do in life, it doesn’t mean they are actually making money from it. There was one during the pandemic estimated loss of 2.7 million jobs and more than $ 150 billion in sales of goods and services for the creative industries across the country, accounting for nearly a third of all jobs in these industries and 9% of annual sales.

Keren Sachs, CEO and Founder of The Luupe, is To change the economic landscape for creatives and photographers. Realizing that there weren’t any brands hiring different creators and photographers, she started The Luupe on a mission to connect more women and non-binary photographers to jobs for their own income. Working with brands like Dropbox and SoundCloud, The Luupe’s photography community has earned over $ 100,000 in income. In November of that year, Sachs completed a $ 3 million seed round led by Sara Adler of The Wave, the main investor in Airbnb.

“I’ve always looked at different communities and found that the communities tend to focus on amateur photographers or amateur artists versus professional developers,” explains Sachs. “I’ve always wondered where the professionals go when they want to seek community. Being a creator or a photographer can be very lonely and isolating. How do you connect with other people? I began to realize that there really was no place for professionals. And there were certainly very few places for female professionals to come together, network and support one another rather than compete with one another. … This is where the original idea of ​​The Luupe arose. When I saw this gap and wanted to build a community, I reached out to about 40 photographers and told them about this idea that I had to bring them together to build this community. But beyond the community, I wanted to help them generate income. I wanted women to be able to put more money in their pockets. “

Sachs’ career began at National Geographic as a picture editor who supported the photographers on site or created the content behind the scenes. She then switched to freelance work for the Wall Street Journal before joining Martha Stewart Living as Director of Photography and Merchandising.

She held a few other positions at various companies before Shutterstock brought her on as an acquisition manager and helped acquire content on the website. Sachs was then promoted to Director of Content Development where she helped develop Offset, the company’s leading content library. During this time, she began to think about the different platforms for creative use and noticed the gap between amateur and professional photographers. As her idea got better, she decided to leave Shutterstock to build her own community.

She began to seek help and advice from the people she trusted most. Sachs then interviewed around 40 photographers she had previously worked with to find out their insights, needs, and wants, and whether or not they would get involved with this type of community.

“There was a lot of self-doubt,” says Sachs humbly. “There are a lot of impostor syndromes. With all of the wonderful things that have happened to women in particular, it was important to me to build on that foundation. I took in as much as I could, made a lot of mistakes and learned from them. “

Your biggest challenge was raising funds. She quickly realized that, as a non-traditional founder, she had to expand the platform and show fit and traction in line with the product market. So Sachs invested $ 1,200 of their own money to start the platform and protect the name. The Luupe immediately generated revenue. She spoke to some angel investors who helped her raise $ 100,000. Two years later, Sachs completed the seed round.

“It wasn’t an easy task,” she smiles. “It was incredibly challenging and therefore incredibly rewarding to complete this money.”

As Sachs continues to grow the platform and develop a positive, supportive community, it focuses on the following key steps:

  • Develop relationships in every experience you have. This network of people will be able to advise you throughout your professional life.
  • Ask for help and guidance. Making your own decisions can put you at risk or put you behind the scenes. People want to help. If they don’t know what you are doing, they won’t be able to offer advice.
  • Never give up. Even if it’s just a small step, it still moves the needle forward. It becomes a problem when you do nothing.

“It is a challenge [raising capital] as a woman, “Sachs concludes.” The biggest lesson was how difficult it is to be a solo founder. I’ve learned to deal with rejections in ways that I could never have imagined. I learned that I would have a lot of no’s, and it was going to be really hard; it would only make me stronger I also learned how much I believe in this business that I would keep my head down and keep moving and not let the no or rejection break what I knew we could build. “


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In Tribeca, the city’s longest-running photo gallery is celebrating its 50th anniversary https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/24/in-tribeca-the-citys-longest-running-photo-gallery-is-celebrating-its-50th-anniversary/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 23:01:30 +0000 https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/24/in-tribeca-the-citys-longest-running-photo-gallery-is-celebrating-its-50th-anniversary/ A recent opening at the Soho Photo Gallery, which has up to seven artists showing their work each month. The gallery offers almost 400 meters of wall space for hanging pictures. Photo: Carl Glassman / Tribeca Trib As Tribeca grows in importance as a gallery district, the art space that has been in the neighborhood […]]]>

A recent opening at the Soho Photo Gallery, which has up to seven artists showing their work each month. The gallery offers almost 400 meters of wall space for hanging pictures. Photo: Carl Glassman / Tribeca Trib

As Tribeca grows in importance as a gallery district, the art space that has been in the neighborhood the longest becomes possibly one of the most overlooked places.

This month the Soho Photo Gallery is celebrating its 50th anniversary, the last 42 of them in their current home at 15 White Street, where it opened in December 1979 and is the longest running photo gallery in town.

Over the years, the cooperative gallery’s exhibitions of members, invited artists, and winners of national and international competitions have shown a wide range of photographic practices and techniques. Such diversity can be seen in a single visit, when traditional street and landscape photography shares gallery walls with conceptual and abstract works or images made in a way that transcends the confines of the medium itself.

The paintings are for sale, but selling is hardly the goal.

“It’s always been a place where you can publish something and have your colleagues measure it,” says Martin Rich, a long-time member. “And that made me want to keep working and do better.”

Joel Morgovsky described the gallery as “essential” to his life as a photographer. “If I weren’t associated with Soho Photo, I wouldn’t be as passionate about photography as I am now,” he said.

Morgovsky noted that a growing number of people are “involved” in photography, “but they don’t know how to put together portfolios, put together and edit shows, and think about photography in general. Soho Photo has always been that. ”

Members are upset that the New York Times recently ignored them in a major roundup of the Tribeca galleries. “Where were we?“Said Norman Borden, the member in charge of the galleryof half-century commemoration. “We were there first. weare pioneers!

A gallery-wide anniversary exhibition will be on view from January 7th to 30th. “Review: The First 50 Years of Soho Photo” shows a selection of 100 works that have been shown in the gallery over the past five decades.

The gallery’s name reflects its origins, at 143 Prince Street, where it opened in December 1971 in a loft on the second floor. There was no bathroom or office, but plenty of hanging space. The idea of ​​founding the gallery is attributed to the New York Times photographer Librado (Lee) Romero, who is one of the eight founding members.

“Back then there were one or two photo galleries in town that we couldn’t see,” says David Chalk, one of the galleries‘S Founder and its director for more than 20 years. “So we had our own place and it thrived.”

The gallery moved to two rooms on 13th Street (one above Quad Cinema) before moving to White Street. During these early years, works by Andre Kertesz, Minor White, Ansel Adams, and other prominent photographers were shown. In 1979, however, the gallery had to move and rooms were difficult to find. When a location on Wooster Street fell through, Ben Fernandez, director of the New School’s photography department, offered the school auditorium as a meeting place to buy time to continue the search.

Eventually Chalk stumbled upon 15 White Street, a former poultry market on the first floor of one of Tribeca’s early cooperatives. “It was a mess,” Chalk recalled in a telephone interview. “There were feathers and bird droppings and it was terrible. It had great potential, but it was terrible. ”

So bad that Chalk withheld the address from other members even though he asked for donations to remodel the room. But he had a vision for what it could be, and an architectural rendering helped sell the idea.

“You saw this beautiful drawing,” he said. “It was like a magical thing.”

Members participate in all aspects of the gallery operation, and it was their work during the five month construction period that transformed a worse-than-raw space into the polished venue it is today. Shows by up to seven artists can be accommodated in the galleries on the ground floor and on the mezzanine.

“Everyone took their time and that’s what made the gallery so close to people,” said Chalk. “Somehow she put that into space. Not the money, but the spirit. ”

There are now 90 members, up from 110 at the height of the gallery. Many have aged with the gallery, but efforts are in place to attract new talent, including an internship program with photography students from the Fashion Institute of Technology and online exhibit opportunities for younger photographers who are not ready or may not attend.

The challenges of keeping the gallery running have been “continuous,” said Borden. “We pay the rent and keep members and try to get our name out there.” Even so, it survived the pandemic that temporarily closed the gallery with online exhibitions. And members stayed involved by sharing their work weekly through Zoom.

“It wasn’t a competition. It was just to show what we’re doing, ”said Borden. “People really appreciated that we were a community.”


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Italy obscura: Photographer Abelardo Morell opens the mind’s eye https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/23/italy-obscura-photographer-abelardo-morell-opens-the-minds-eye/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 15:01:58 +0000 https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/23/italy-obscura-photographer-abelardo-morell-opens-the-minds-eye/ Abelardo Morell, “View of Landscape Outside Florence”, 2010, archived pigment print. Image courtesy of the artist This may sound confusing, but it is a better representation of the tapestry of consciousness, with its threads of memory and brooding tangled with external demands, than a simple photograph could be. Even the inversion happens in our own […]]]>
Abelardo Morell, “View of Landscape Outside Florence”, 2010, archived pigment print. Image courtesy of the artist

This may sound confusing, but it is a better representation of the tapestry of consciousness, with its threads of memory and brooding tangled with external demands, than a simple photograph could be. Even the inversion happens in our own skull when we see: The student projects images upside down onto the retina. The optic nerve quickly straightens them up again.

73-year-old Morell, who lives in Newton and exhibits around the world, is the first known artist to make art out of a camera obscura. The always innovative photographer is fascinated by the photographic process, which is so similar to that of seeing, which makes reality in the picture and the picture the fuel of the imagination.

the camera obscura was first used in the fifth century BC. Mentioned in a document in China Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo used it to study perspective. It was speculated by the painter David Hockney Among other things, that Vermeer traced camera obscura images in order to capture the innovative perspectives in his paintings. Other painters, such as Caravaggio and Ingres, may have used the device as well.

Morell loves painting and has played with the camera’s ability to paint in other works; he painted glass negatives with color and added color to photographs. When photographing Italy, he makes use of local art and layers phantasm on phantasm.

In “Camera Obscura: View of Gardens on Folding Screen, Villa La Pietra, Florence, Italy” the image floods a canvas painted with the Gardens of Majesty Renaissance mansion, New York University’s Italian campus. The cypresses of the projection hang like stalactites over an idyllic painting scene framed by columns of a couple and their companion, who strolls past balustrades and statues. It is an echo chamber of the villa’s garden – hints of reality outside, its projection and representation in an intoxicating mixture.

Sometimes Morell uses a prism to mirror the projected image. In “Camera Obscura: View of Villa Entrance in Blue Gallery, Villa la Pietra, Florence, Italy”, a long, tree-framed, sunlit street band is directed right up, its projection steeply a doorway between two small marble statues. It hits the horizon at the top of the doorway and hits an alley in an urban landscape hanging over it – today’s path that winds its way into yesterday’s.

Abelardo Morell, "Camera Obscura: View of the entrance of the villa in the Blue Gallery, Villa la Pietra, Florence, Italy," 2017, archival pigment print.
Abelardo Morell, “Camera Obscura: View of Villa Entrance in Blue Gallery, Villa la Pietra, Florence, Italy”, 2017, archival pigment print. Image courtesy of the artist

The contrasts in these photos are as magnetic as the confluences. The old town pours like a living dream in “Camera Obscura: View of Florence from the Hotel Excelsior, Italy” on a wall above a bed and inundates modern amenities such as a light switch and a lamp. In the center, the shadow of a chandelier falls over a painting on the wall that reflects the light from the projection. These final details complicate the photo in delicious ways, adding ghosts of shadow and shine to the mix of new and old, indoor and outdoor.

Abelardo Morell, "Camera Obscura: View of Florence from the Hotel Excelsior, Italy," 2017, archival pigment print.
Abelardo Morell, “Camera Obscura: View of Florence from Hotel Excelsior, Italy”, 2017, archival pigment print. Image courtesy of the artist

In 2010 Morell and his assistant at the time, photographer CJ Heyliger, designed one lightproof tent, creating a portable camera obscura with a periscope to project an outside image onto the floor inside. This opened up new backgrounds – the textures of grass, earth, and concrete.

A photo wallpaper here shows part of the tent photo “View of Florence from Giardino Bardini, Italy”. The magnificent cityscape with the Florence Cathedral on the left shines crispy on the earth strewn with pebbles and leaves. At first glance, these textures simply roughen the picture and give it the appearance of a centuries-old painting. But a large tangle of branches near the center disturbs the illusion; it looks like broken glass, and suddenly what looked like an old canvas is more like a photograph taken through a broken lens.

The abundance of contradicting details in these photographs creates worlds that we cannot understand as quickly as the optic nerve directs the eye to the world. These contradictions reflect our own inner life, full of projections, granular details and layers that make little sense to anyone but ourselves. So “projecting Italy” is not just Morell’s Italy. It is every viewer’s intimate Italian dream.

ABELARDO MORELL: DESIGN ITALY

At the Fitchburg Art Museum, 185 Elm St., Fitchburg, until February 6th 978-345-4207, www.fitchburgartmuseum.org


Cate McQuaid can be reached at catemcquaid@gmail.com. Follow her on Twitter @cmcq.



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National Geographic photographer Thomas Peschak on a mission to save the glaciers https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/21/national-geographic-photographer-thomas-peschak-on-a-mission-to-save-the-glaciers/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 12:56:39 +0000 https://curtweinhold.com/2021/12/21/national-geographic-photographer-thomas-peschak-on-a-mission-to-save-the-glaciers/ December 21, 2021 Renowned National Geographic photographer, conservationist and Nikon ambassador Thomas Peschak has released a thought-provoking film and two key images showing the major manifestation of climate change on Swiss renowned glaciers. Thomas Peschak has spent much of his award-winning career documenting both the beauty and fragility of the world’s oceans. His latest project, […]]]>

December 21, 2021

Renowned National Geographic photographer, conservationist and Nikon ambassador Thomas Peschak has released a thought-provoking film and two key images showing the major manifestation of climate change on Swiss renowned glaciers.


Thomas Peschak has spent much of his award-winning career documenting both the beauty and fragility of the world’s oceans. His latest project, however, took him to 3,000 meters above sea level in the Swiss Alps. With his Nikon kit in hand, Thomas’s mission was to demonstrate the devastating speed at which the ice is melting and to encourage people to think deeper about the problem through the power of images.

In the past 100 years, glaciers have lost ice at an unprecedented rate, with glaciers in Switzerland losing a full two percent * of their volume in the last year alone. To demonstrate this, Thomas set out to recreate a picture taken in 1959 of two geologists surveying the Gorner Glacier. After searching the mountains for hours, using the dramatic ridges as a guide, he found the exact rock the picture was taken 61 years ago and was stunned by what he found. Less than half of the ice remained in the lower half of the glacier.

Thomas knew he had to take pictures that would capture people’s interests and hearts. “Although most people are aware of climate change, they have never seen it with their own eyes,” he notes. “It’s easy to make people fall in love with pictures of cute animals like lions and dolphins, but for glaciers you have to get a picture that is so compelling that it makes people worry – because glaciers are now too endangered. “

Image: Thomas Peschak

With this in mind, he set up his shot to mirror the original photo, but felt that the image alone would not be enough to tell the story he wanted. Thomas felt that the great effects of climate change on this landscape would be better illustrated if both the old image and the new scene were included in one image. With his Nikon Z 9 and a slow shutter speed, he “collaborated” with the wind, resulting in an image that almost looks like it’s moving, similar to the glacier itself.

The Z 9 turned out to be the perfect tool for this shot. Since he always shot with DSLRs, Thomas was nervous at first to switch to a mirrorless camera for this project. However, he now calls the camera a game changer. I describe it as “the best of a DSLR and the best of a mirrorless camera combined – this intuitive and rugged camera is perfect for my photography style. I’m going to switch to mirrorless … and I think it’ll change the way I take photographs forever. “

In addition to his “now and then” shot, Thomas also wanted to capture an image that inspires and excites people and that really cares about this glacier ecosystem. This ambition led him into the glacier itself, through one of its many magical caves, to showcase the physical beauty of the glacier. He searched and found a cave with a majestic opening with the incredible Matterhorn in the middle and knew that this was the perfect place.

Image: Thomas Peschak

Thomas waited with this picture (above) in a pitch-black cave at minus temperatures until after midnight in order to avoid the constant meltwater.

Thomas challenges himself to adhere to strict photojournalistic standards and restrictions. An image processing such as the digital combination of several recordings is therefore not possible. So here, inside the glacier, he was faced with a challenging situation. The balancing shooting in a pitch-black cave required an extremely large depth of field to reach the climber, but also to capture the moonlit Matterhorn in the background.

He also didn’t want to generate “star trails” with long exposure times or rely on post-production. By using an extremely high ISO for a camera of this megapixel number, Thomas deliberately pushed the boundaries of the Z 9 to capture that fleeting moment, resulting in a stunning keepsake as part of his larger portfolio on climate change. The picture had a lot of moving parts, but the results were worth it.

“People have no idea the size of this place,” says Thomas, who chose the climber in this picture to emphasize how small we are “compared to the sheer size and size of nature”. He found this ironic, because “together we made this gigantic glacier retreat and almost disappear”.

He continues; “I think this picture shows how beautiful, grand and iconic a glacier can be, and it will hopefully show people a glacier in a way they have never seen before.”

With the help of the impressive Z9 camera, five different lights, a fast shutter speed and a high ISO setting, Thomas captured this incredible shot. For this project he used the Nikon Z9 camera and Nikon Nikkor Z 14-24mm f / 2.8.

Thomas continues to strive for change and shows people with his pictures how vulnerable the environment is – from the deepest oceans to the highest mountain peaks. To support its work, Nikon released the short film today documenting Thomas’ project in the Swiss Alps. You can the “The glacier” Video here: https://youtu.be/hlnP2W_9Trc


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